Gendered patterns of coping responses to academic sexism in a group of Spanish secondary students

Citation:
Sáinz, Milagros, José Luís Martínez, and Julio Meneses. "Gendered patterns of coping responses to academic sexism in a group of Spanish secondary students." (Submitted).

Abstract:

This study analyzes predictors of students’ coping responses to academic sexism. 954 high school students (mean age = 17; 57% girls) participated. Boys were therefore more likely to use avoidance responses, whereas girls confronting and help-seeking responses. Likewise, hierarchical regression analyses suggest that girls and students whose parents had high educational level, and without sexist attitudes about women’s higher level of competence in biology and languages, were more likely to deploy confronting responses. Similarly, girls and students who did not embrace either of the stereotypes that boys are better at science and technology and that girls are better at biology and languages were more likely to seek help. Furthermore, boys and students who believed that girls are better at biology and languages were more likely to develop avoidance responses. Interaction between gender and parental educational level shows that boys with highly educated parents were more likely to avoid the situation.